Thursday, November 15, 2007

A chain of anti-Semitism


Louis Villarrubia, known to members of the Saint Benedict Center cult as "Brother" Andre Marie, has openly promoted the writings of Fr. Denis Fahey, a Redemptorist priest who was known for his anti-Semitism. Fr. Feeney was clearly influenced by Fr. Fahey as was another hate priest: Fr. Charles Edward Coughlin.

Fr. Coughlin, a Canadian born Roman Catholic priest, is popularly known as "The Father of Hate Radio." His radio program, which included praises of Hitler and Mussolini, had an audience of more than forty million during the 1930's.

Read about Fr. Coughlin here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Father_Coughlin

http://coat.ncf.ca/our_magazine/links/53/coughlin.html


Three individuals influenced by the writings of the anti-Semitic Fr. Fahey. Each with his own legacy of hate: Fr. Coughlin in the 1930's, Fr. Feeney in the 1940's and 1950's and Louis Villarrubia from the 1990's to the present.

A chain of anti-Semitism. By the grace of God, this chain will be broken. It has already enslaved too many people.

4 comments:

Marie Tremblay said...

You can see the legacy of hate: Fahey influenced Coughlin and Feeney, who in turn influenced "Brother" Francis who in turn influenced "Brother" Andre Marie. I agree with you Paul, it's time to break that chain.

Margaret said...

Someone, I believe it was Carrie at SBC Watch, said that the SBC cult is a house of cards that's coming down. I couldn't agree more. The SBC's game is played out. It's time for them to fold....they had a losing hand.

Frank said...

Seems like every generation has its' Feeney huh?

David Nemlin said...

Fr. Coughlin had an audience of more than forty million in the 1930's? That is nothing short of incredible. There weren't even 40 million Catholics in the United States during that time. What does this say about anti-Semitism in America during the 30's? Seems pretty clear to me. Maybe that's why when Hitler was killing the Jews with his "final solution," so many Americans were silent? The New York Times praised Pope Pius XII in 1941 as a "lone voice" against Hitlerism. Makes you think doesn't it?

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